Background document on telecommunication connectivity in Central Asia

Background document on telecommunication connectivity in Central Asia

Date: 
Wednesday, January 15, 2014
Type: 
Public information and advocacy materials
Abstract

The analysis revealed that the region is greatly reliant upon trans‐border terrestrial fiber optic connectivity, which places it at a distinct competitive disadvantage relative to coastal markets, which benefit from submarine fiber optic cable systems offering higher capacity, greater cost effectiveness, and more extensive reach than the region’s existing terrestrial connectivity. With the exception of the Russian Federation, none of the countries in this study have oceanic coastlines. Consequently, each landlocked country is at an inherent disadvantage to coastal countries with respect to access to cost‐effective international bandwidth; while the cost of providing international bandwidth to coastal countries is limited to actual cable infrastructure costs, landlocked countries bear not only the actual cable infrastructure costs but also the bandwidth transit and interconnection costs imposed by their neighbors. One of the countries analyzed in the study, Uzbekistan, is “doubly‐landlocked,” a status which makes the country’s access to affordable international bandwidth exceedingly challenging.

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Broadband Infrastructure in North and Central Asia FINAL _English_0Download