Publications

 
1 Jan 2009
Working paper series

Policymakers in the region are more aware than ever of the economic, social, health and environmental benefits of adequate sanitation. Various efforts have been made to raise the political profile of sanitation, through a United Nations General Assembly resolution (No. 61/192) that declared 2008the International Year of Sanitation, regional high-level sanitation conferences (SACOSAN and EASAN) and close monitoring of the related Millennium Development Goal targets.

1 Jan 2009
Flagship publications and book series

Family structure, functions and values are experiencing unprecedented changes in Asia and the Pacific. However, there is often an absence of a family perspective in social policymaking in general and in social protection policymaking in particular.

 
21 Nov 2008
Journals

Asia-Pacific Population Journal Volume 23 was released in 2008.

  • Volume 23 No. 1
  • Volume 23 No. 2
  • Volume 23 No. 3
15 Sep 2008
Journals

The Asia-Pacific Development Journal (APDJ) is published twice a year by the Macroeconomic Policy and Development Division of the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP).

The primary objective of the APDJ is to provide a platform for the exchange of knowledge, experience, ideas, information and data on all aspects of economic and social development issues and concerns facing the region and to stimulate policy debate and assist in the formulation of policy.

31 Aug 2008
Working paper series

Over the past few years, energy security and sustainable development have moved up the global agenda. There are two main reasons for this: first, the impact of high and often volatile energy prices; second, concerns over environmental sustainability and particularly about the global climate. Both issues are critically important for Asia and the Pacific—a region in which impressive economic growth has boosted the demand for energy and put corresponding strains on the environment.

1 May 2008
Flagship publications and book series

After the fastest growth in a decade in 2007, the developing economies of the Asia-Pacific region are expected to grow at a slightly slower but still robust 7.7% in 2008. The region’s developed economies are expected to grow at 1.6% in 2008, slipping from 2% in 2007. China and India, the region’s economic locomotives, are expected to continue growing briskly in 2008, boosting the rest of the region. Commodity- and energy-exporting countries, particularly the Russian Federation, are expected to add to the momentum.

7 Apr 2008
Books

This is the third in a series of regional reports on the Millennium Development Goals in the Asia-Pacific region. It assesses the prospects of reaching the goals and targets, highlighting the potential gaps and indicating how these can be filled. It also looks at the potential for adding value to national initiatives through broader international partnerships through which the United Nations and other international organizations ‘deliver as one’.

3 Mar 2008
Journals

The Asia-Pacific Development Journal (APDJ) is published twice a year by the Macroeconomic Policy and Development Division of the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP).

The primary objective of the APDJ is to provide a platform for the exchange of knowledge, experience, ideas, information and data on all aspects of economic and social development issues and concerns facing the region and to stimulate policy debate and assist in the formulation of policy.

9 Jan 2008
Books

As ESCAP member countries seek to spread the development that has taken place in the coastal areas inland, replicating sea ports at inland locations is a policy measure that is receiving attention. In order to make informed decisions policy makers need to understand the current logistics environment and the factors that would result in a successful dry port that would attract logistics clusters.

1 Jan 2008
Flagship publications and book series

International migration has become a structural element of societies and economies in Asia and the Pacific. In 2005, the region was home to over 30 per cent of the world’s estimated 191 million international migrants. Remittances sent in 2007 to countries in the ESCAP region exceeded $121 billion, improving the quality of life of millions of poor households and sustaining national economies, financing balance of payments and increasing foreign exchange receipts. However, although the benefits of international migration are apparent, its costs remain an area of great concern.

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