Publications

9 Dec 2014
Working paper series

The November 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) leaders’ meeting in Beijing has generated momentum behind the proposed Free Trade Area of the Asia-Pacific (FTAAP). This note reviews the prospects for the FTAAP which are strongly linked to progress in two other large regional trade agreements currently under discussion: the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP).

Statistical Yearbook for Asia and the Pacific 2014
9 Dec 2014
Flagship publications and book series

The Statistical Yearbook 2014 is an electronic file only, it consists of (1) short analytical texts on 32 selected diverse topics, such as population, education, health, poverty and inequalities, gender, economy, environment and connectivity in the region and related key messages as well as relevant data tables, and (2) country profiles of main development indicators for each of the 58 regional member countries/areas of ESCAP.

The Statistical Yearbook is accompanied by the following products:

 
21 Nov 2014
Journals

Asia-Pacific Population Journal Volume 29 was released in 2014.

21 Nov 2014
Books

This handbook serves three purposes, namely: i) to identify best practices in responsible and sustainable banking and finances; ii) to raise awareness and undertake policy advocacy in the area of responsible banking and finance; and iii) to serve as a tool for undertaking capacity development through training and other pertinent programmes. The approach taken to producing this handbook has been to highlight three aspects, namely: i) corporate governance; ii) corporate social responsibility; and iii) corporate sustainability, as they pertain to banks and financial institutions.

14 Nov 2014
Working paper series

This paper examines the agenda of this year’s G20 Brisbane summit – namely, to promote strong economic growth and employment outcomes and to make the global economy more resilient to future shocks – in the context of key policy debates in the Asia-Pacific region and the discussions of the United Nations post-2015 development agenda. In particular, priority areas related to investment and infrastructure, trade, employment, financial inclusion and remittances, financial regulatory reforms, international tax cooperation and anti-corruption measures, and energy markets are explored.

7 Nov 2014
Working paper series

This note reviews the emerging imbalances in the Chinese economy and the attendant need for structural reforms, including financial sector and services liberalization. The role that the recently launched Shanghai Free Trade Zone could play in accelerating these reforms is then considered, alongside an assessment of progress to date.

Stats Brief
7 Nov 2014
Working paper series

An official statistician reading the proposal of the Open Working Group (OWG) for Sustainable Development Goals might have two simultaneous reactions: doubt and excitement. The proposal that the UN General Assembly’s 30-member OWG forwarded to the Assembly on 19 July 2014 contains 17 goals with 169 targets covering a broad range of sustainable development issues, including ending poverty and hunger, improving health and education, making cities more sustainable, combating climate change, and protecting oceans and forests.

4 Nov 2014
Books

Bridging Transport, ICT and Energy Infrastructure Gaps for Seamless Regional Connectivity, is a contribution by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) to deliberations at the Second United Nations Conference on Landlocked Developing Countries (LLDCs) in Vienna, Austria, from 3 to 5 November 2014.

1 Nov 2014
Books

Advances in technology and logistics have helped boost economies around the world, but have not removed the main challenge faced by the 12 landlocked developing countries (LLDCs) in Asia, namely Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bhutan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mongolia, Nepal, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. With no access to the sea, these countries must conduct their trade through neighbouring countries, which results in added costs.

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